Depeche Art

East City Art’s Mid-City Gallery Exhibitions and News - January 2019

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Foundry Gallery
Foundry Gallery opens the 2019 exhibition year with a group show of its member artists titled “Winter Light.” The exhibition centers loosely on the theme of “attenuated light,” according to the gallery’s press release, a time when one finds “introspection and odd cheer.” Audiences can expect a wide array of work including painting and photography in both representational and expressive forms.

Amy Bar Wilson’s expressive “Two Rivers Meet” captures the energy of merging waters in a contrasting warm palette of oranges and yellows, offset by slight punctuations of cool grays and cerulean blues, which create the impression of movement.

In contrast, Sheila Blake’s “#9 Pine Avenue,” a house portrait of a small cottage in Takoma Park, Maryland, captures the region’s winter months by highlighting the home’s garden. Barren deciduous trees and browned ornamental grasses reflect the dormant growing season, while an errant evergreen vine climbing up a large tree trunk, a patch of lawn and two smaller conifers provide the only verdant elements in the composition.

“Winter Light” should provide viewers with an overview of the gallery’s member artists.

Jowita Wyszomirska – Changing Matter 1 (61°31’13.08”N 142°55’14.59”W), 2018, Mixed media, 26 x 34 1/4 inches. Image courtesy Gallery Neptune and Brown.

Gallery Neptune & Brown
Jowita Wyszomirska’s work centers on fleeting phenomena which one catches for a moment, only to discover that they have disappeared just as quickly as they manifested. The artist quotes the following examples of such ephemera: “A cloud casting a shadow as it crosses the sun, the ever-changing shoreline where land and water meet, the sensory experience of the wind, and the warmth of a shimmering light touching the skin.” Wyszomirska has used satellite imagery from NASA to observe the ever-changing Chesapeake Bay region. More recently, her work has focused on the effects of climate change by observing the retreating ice of the North American glaciers.

Her work uses actual data which she translates into artistic forms such as drawings, paintings and installations. The resulting effect juggles representational elements, such as observed data, and abstract elements which she carefully layers during her creative process.

Wyszomirska was born in Poland and moved with her family to Chicago in the early 1990s. She has a BFA from Illinois State University and a master’s degree in fine art from the University of Maryland. She has exhibited nationally in solo and two-person exhibitions. Her honors include residency fellowships at the Jentel Foundation, Wyoming; Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, Nebraska; and International School of Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture in Umbria, Italy.

Tory Cowles – #990: Three kinds of metal roofing-copper, corrugated, and steel, burned wire, metal fencing, 76”x 50”x 22”. Image courtesy Touchstone Gallery.

Touchstone Gallery
Tory Cowles’ “Hard Wired” solo exhibition at Touchstone Gallery brings to life many of the discarded items that she finds on the organic farm where she and her husband live. Cowles describes her initial impetus for creating sculptures and installations from found material as similar to the spontaneity that abstract expressionist painters employ when composing their work. She explains that from this “abstract expressionist process” the end result “depends on the rawness of the materials, the unexpectedness of the composition and the mystery of how materials are transformed.” Her work “expresses how she sees the world – dangerous, ancient, raw, out of control – but also interesting, unexpected, new and magnificent.”

Cowles’ interdisciplinary approach to art-making includes a performance component. Through dance, worn sculptures fuse with the artist, becoming one. In so doing, Cowles brings levity to that which once appeared heavy or rough, like steel wire or corrugated metal, rendering the materials light and to a certain extent humorous. Cowles, a resident artist of Alexandria’s Torpedo Factory, teaches abstract painting at Glen Echo Park’s Yellow Barn.

Gallery Neptune & Brown
1530 14th St. NW
202-986-1200 | www.neptunefineart.com
Hours: Wed. to Sat., 12-7 p.m., Sun. 1-4 p.m.
Through March

Jowita Wyszomirska
Foundry Gallery
2118 Eighth St. NW
202-232-0203 | www.foundrygallery.org
Hours: Wed. to Sun., 1-7 p.m.
Through Jan. 27

“Light in Winter” group exhibition
Hamiltonian Gallery
1353 U St. NW
202-332-1116 | www.hamiltoniangallery.com
Hours: Tues. to Sat., 12-6 p.m.
January schedule TBD

Hemphill Fine Arts
1515 14th St. NW
202-234-5601 | www.hemphillfinearts.com
Hours: Tues. to Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
January schedule TBD

Long View Gallery
1234 Ninth St. NW
202-232-4788 | www.longviewgallerydc.com
Hours: Wed. to Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
January schedule TBD

Touchstone Gallery
901 New York Ave. NW
202-347-2787 | www.touchstonegallery.com
Hours: Wed. to Fri., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. | Weekends, 12-5 p.m.
Through Jan. 31
Artist talk: Sat., Jan. 19, 4-6 p.m., “Hard Wired” by Tory Cowles

 

Phil Hutinet is the publisher of East City Art, DC’s alternative art source. For more information visit www.eastcityart.com.